Wednesday, May 07, 2008

Edible Sunscreen?

If you've been reading this blog for a while, you know that I don't use sunscreen unless I'm going to be out in the middle of the day (e.g., on a boat). Dr. Christiane Northrup and other actually advocate daily sun exposure (again, about 20 mins, not baking on the beach!) to help with fertility (helps reset hormones, Vitamin D, etc.)

We also notice that if we're very well nourished (plenty of antioxidants, etc.) we tend not to burn, anyway. Shea butter is also a nice protective against sun exposure.

Again, you are what you eat.

This is from the very informative newsletter of Vital Choice seafood.



Edible Sunscreen?
Colorful Foods Seen to Deter Sun Damage

Tomato paste seen to reduce skin’s damage from UV sunrays; Other allies include tea, berries, cocoa, and fish
by Craig Weatherby

Click for full story

Moderate sun exposure seems to reduce the overall risk of cancer, probably thanks to UV-induced creation of vitamin D in the skin.

Last year, we wrote about the exaggerated cancer risks of sun exposure – and the long-overlooked anti-cancer benefits of sun-generated vitamin D – see “Cancer Society’s Anti-Sun Ads Decried as Deceptive”.

On a related front, recent years have witnessed a plethora of studies linking diet to protection against sun-induced skin damage, including burning, wrinkling, and pre-cancerous DNA changes.

For example, higher intake of omega-3s – and lower intake of competing, pro-inflammatory omega-6 fats – appears to blunt the adverse effects of overexposure to strong sunlight.

(Dermatologist Nicholas Perricone, M.D., deserves credit for bringing the “cosmeceutical” effects of dietary omega-3s to public attention, and for identifying wild Salmon as their healthiest food source. See “Fish Fats Called Credible Foes of Skin Aging and Skin Cancer”.)

And a fast-growing roster of research results suggest that antioxidant-rich vegetables, fruits, teas and plant extracts can reduce damage to skin cells caused by UV sunrays.

Aussies' study identifies food allies and foes

In 2001, Australian researchers published the results of a population study designed to test the proposition that food-borne antioxidants might blunt UV-induced skin damage.

They looked for correlations between dietary habits and the extent of skin wrinkling in older people of various ethnic backgrounds living in Greece, Sweden, and Australia.

Their reported results supported the food-as-sunscreen hypothesis, and pinpointed some helpful and harmful foods:

“…a high intake of … olive oil, legumes, fish, vegetables and cereal appeared to be protective [against skin damage] … In contrast, a high intake of meat, sugar and its products and [full-fat, unfermented] dairy products appeared to be adverse.”

This study illustrates that skin wrinkling … may be influenced by the types of foods consumed.” (Purba MB et al. 2001)

2 comments:

Hamid said...

This is the first time I am reading about the Edible sunscreen. I am very pleased to see this report. First I start searching it for the skin condition vitiligo.
Althoug the sunscreen is widely used for the protacting the skin from skin condition like Melanoma, Psoriasys and Vitiligo and many other.
But one serious issue is always associated with the sunscreen made by the toxic chemical which can effects the skin far more bitter than the sun.
So in this regard this Edible sunscreen hypothesis is realy need of the day.

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